Pekin school uses gardening to help students with disabilities

Pekin school uses gardening to help students with disabilities.
SHARON WOODS HARRIS/GATEHOUSE MEDIA ILLINOIS Tim Kennedy, principal and program coordinator at Schramm Educational Center in Pekin, checks on the flowers and vegetable plants in the raised planters at the school.
“Our goal is to grow things that we can then have the kids sell or turn into some kind of job that the kids can do,” said Kennedy.
We’re trying to expose them to different types of plants, different colors or (a) different touch sensation.” Kennedy said the school formed a garden committee several years ago, cleaned up the property and started some planters with flowers and vegetables.
The district has plant beds on the far edge of the property, but it is difficult to get water there, said Kennedy.
“Our students are the lowest-functioning students in the county, and 95 percent of them are non-verbal,” said Kennedy.
“We want the kids to get as independent as possible.
With independence comes any kind of skill that would help them either do a job at TCRC — I don’t know if many of our kids will get a job out in the community, but if there’s a possibility we would really like to see that.
Word got out, and the East Peoria Kiwanis called one day and said members wanted to help get the greenhouse.
The committee at first thought a prefab, plastic-type structure would work, but the East Peoria Kiwanis is going to build a permanent structure for the school, Kennedy said.

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Punch List: Help for your garden and landscape during the dog days of summer

Punch List: Help for your garden and landscape during the dog days of summer.
In the landscape The meaning of the saying “dog days of summer” has more to do with astrology than hot weather.
The tales blamed floods and even sour wine on the dog days, and Homer even associated disasters and wars with these days from July through mid-August.
The additional leaf area cools and shades the crowns of the grass.
Water lawns in the morning, infrequently and deeply — to a depth of 4 inches.
Vegetables and herbs Consistent high temperatures (in the 90s) can be tough on plants and may cause blossom drop, which means less fruit.
This is common on squash, zucchini, tomatoes and green beans.
Large, leafed vegetables like cucumbers, melons and squash are quick to wilt during the heat of the day.
If they are getting enough water they will revive in the evening.
Vegetables require deep watering and mulch to keep soils cool.

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NOAA’s Climate.gov Says Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Responsible For Methane Increases, Not Oil and Gas

NOAA’s Climate.gov Says Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Responsible For Methane Increases, Not Oil and Gas.
“In developing countries with burgeoning populations, methane control could wind up pitted against the need to expand food production.
“That [isotope] drop casts doubt on one of the first explanations experts considered for the post-2007 rise: an increase in methane emitted from fossil fuels, including “fugitive” methane gas escaping during oil and natural gas drilling,” wrote Lindsey and Scott.
But a regulatory “impasse” on agricultural and wetland mitigation, according to Lindsey and Scott, “might intensify the need to control emissions from other sources, including fossil fuels.” “If controlling methane emissions remains part of U.S. climate and air quality policy, NOAA research will help policy makers figure out where to start,” the authors continued.
All those sources of methane, to a greater or lesser extent, are enriched in carbon-13, not depleted,” wrote Lindsey and Scott, saying that, “It’s a counterintuitive finding: methane from fossil fuels is higher than we thought, but it seems to be making up a smaller share of total global emissions.” With those sources ruled out, Schwietzke wrote, “The decline in the 13-C isotope of methane in the atmosphere indicates that microbial sources must have an increasing share of total methane emissions globally.” Ed Dlugokencky, a research chemist with NOAA’s Earth System Research Center, says that while the biogenic or microbial thesis is strong, the exact source is unclear, telling Climate.gov, “it seems like methane emissions are increasing most in the tropics and mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, and we have some ideas why, but no definite answers.” The Week That Was: 2017-07-01 (July 1, 2017) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President Climategate 2017?
Witnesses suggest the fire appears to have been concentrated around the building’s solar panels.
Large blaze breaks out at brand new block of £1million flats in East London… May 04, 2017 | Ted Nordhaus […] This disturbing and memorable story has kept coming back to me the last few years, as a cadre of climate activists, ideologically motivated scholars, and sympathetic journalists have started labeling an ever-expanding circle of people they disagree with climate deniers.
Climate change, of course, is real and demons… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has rejected a motion to delay implementation of Obama era methane emission laws which limit allowed emissions from oil and gas drilling.
Susan Dudley, president of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, and Marcus Peacock, executive vice president of the Business Roundtable, published… From Physorg and the “if we can just figure out how to conceal the taste with sugar” movement.
I’ll be running the blog for the… Submitted by Larry Hamlin A recent EIA report on energy production shows that wind and solar despite receiving tens of billions in government subsidies provided only 3.2% of U.S. energy in year 2016.

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Every coal waste dump site is a disaster waiting to happen

Despite an EPA rule that requires power companies to dispose of the waste responsibly and monitor water quality near the dumping sites, coal ash continues to be a serious environmental concern.
The rule regulating coal ash is weak and gives utilities the option to dump coal ash in landfills and old mines — often turning them into toxic waste sites.
Many are located in and around marginalized communities without the power to fight back.
Starting in 2009, the coal ash was dumped into a landfill, and local activists charged the leak with threatening community health and the surrounding environment.
But some environmental justice advocates say that landfills are not always safe.
Power companies would have to line their disposal sites to prevent leaking, monitor local water quality, and release more information to the public about their disposal activities.
The many new regulations, Evans notes, are “relatively easy to get around” because “there are lots of holes in the ground” that aren’t covered by the CCR rule.
Because the CCR rule doesn’t include enforcement from the EPA, fighting coal waste disposal sites falls on the backs of communities with fewer resources to fight back.
A waste-hauling company had applied for a permit to dump coal ash in their landfill in 2016.
Jesup residents pushed back — and won.

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Sea Level Rise Accelerating? Not.

Sea Level Rise Accelerating?
Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach There’s a recent and good post here at WUWT by Larry Kummer about sea level rise.
Figure 1 shows an example of some pseudo-tidal data which in fact has an accelerating rate of sea level rise.
As you can see, the blue line showing an accelerating (quadratic) fit matches the data much better than the linear fit (red).
In other words, in the Figure 1 case we can say that there is a statistically significant acceleration in the dataset.
I took the full tidal dataset from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level.
It has 1,505 tide station records in it.
However, some of these are missing a lot of data, some with over half of the data gone.
In other words, not one of these datasets shows statistically significant acceleration.
NOT ONE of these 63 full tidal datasets shows statistically significant acceleration, and more to the point, most of them show only a trivially small difference between acceleration and a simple linear fit.

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Alliant Energy testing soil, support beneath Prairie du Sac Dam spillway

Alliant Energy testing soil, support beneath Prairie du Sac Dam spillway.
Construction teams have begun drilling into the soil beneath the Prairie du Sac hydroelectric dam to check the stability of the soil and condition of the structure’s 4,200 wood support pilings.
At more than 100 years old, the Prairie du Sac hydroelectric dam is one of the oldest power generating systems in the state.
“There is no safety concern but the facility is over a century old and normal wear requires ongoing enhancements.” Public access to the property and water around the facility will not change during the work.
“We do not expect any major impact on anglers, boaters or visitors to the area,” Blank stated.
“With safety being our top priority, per usual, we do ask that those on the river stay a safe distance away from the dam and that people coming to the property be aware of construction or work vehicles.” Scott Reigstad, media contact for Alliant Energy, said deterioration of the wood pilings occurs when the water level drops and the pilings are exposed to air.
In addition to the soil samples, micropiles – metal-based pilings – will be inserted near some of the dam’s wood pilings for additional support.
Examination of the soil samples and data obtained from the micropiles will help Alliant Energy determine how to proceed with the spillway improvement project that will occur sometime in 2018.
Alliant Energy will be study the soil’s engineering properties.
“The main engineering properties of soils are permeability, compressibility and sheer strength,” Reigstad said.

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Jeanine Rubert: Maintenance, method keep July made in shade

Jeanine Rubert: Maintenance, method keep July made in shade.
July in the garden is the time to relax a little and start to enjoy the fruits of our labor.
The beach beckons on sunny days off, but the garden still needs me for watering and maintenance.
I like to work in the garden mornings while it’s still cool or whatever part is in the shade when the mood hits.
Keeping weeds under control not only make the garden look good, it can also help with insect and disease control.
I read an interesting article recently that recommended cutting weeds off at ground level rather than pulling them up.
Pulling weeds up can also bring dormant weed seeds to the surface where they have access to light needed for germination.
Spending a little time in the garden daily is the best line of defense against insect and disease problems.
When controls are needed, look for the OMRI certification on the label or one that states it is for organic gardening.
Jeanine Rubert is co-owner of Pine Hill Nursery and Pine Hill Village Gardens and has lived and gardened in northern Michigan for 38 years.

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Kelly McParland: Another wheel flies off Ontario’s green energy bus, and lands on 340 workers

Windmills were the future.
Clean energy was what McGuinty’s two-year-old Green Energy Act was all about.
Just six years later the plant is closing.
NAFTA is critical to Ontario, particularly given the flow of manufacturing plants leaving the province over high costs, increasing regulation and expensive electricity.
Does anyone remember the last time anything positive emerged from Ontario’s electricity industry, battered and bruised from 13 years of Liberal government manhandling?
The result of the Liberals’ green energy vision has been a catalogue of disasters Wynne’s government has been steadily retreating from a green energy deal with Samsung, even while proclaiming its continued devotion to McGuinty’s green vision.
In return, Samsung cut its planned investment by $2 billion.
In September, the Liberals ended plans for any new projects, admitting the power wasn’t needed.
Climate change, of course, is real and demons… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has rejected a motion to delay implementation of Obama era methane emission laws which limit allowed emissions from oil and gas drilling.
I’ll be running the blog for the… Submitted by Larry Hamlin A recent EIA report on energy production shows that wind and solar despite receiving tens of billions in government subsidies provided only 3.2% of U.S. energy in year 2016.

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Louisiana won’t give the security firm that tracked DAPL opponents a license.

Louisiana won’t give the security firm that tracked DAPL opponents a license..
The state Board of Private Security Examiners rebuffed the North Carolina company known as TigerSwan, citing a legal complaint filed by a similar North Dakota agency charging that the outfit operated in that state without legal permission.
Fabian Blache III, the board’s executive director, said that Louisiana law governing the private security industry is designed to protect the state’s people.
He said TigerSwan — which was denied a license in North Dakota twice — had not shown it could follow regulations.
Earlier this month, the Associated Press reported that Energy Transfer Partners said it no longer had a security presence on the ground in North Dakota, and TigerSwan said it had ended work with the Dallas-based pipeline developer at the end of June.
But apparently the firm was still seeking to work for Energy Transfer Partners in Louisiana, where the company is currently planning to build a 162-mile pipeline known as Bayou Bridge, which would shuttle refined crude oil to hubs in Texas.
That project, like Dakota Access, faces court challenges.
Regional advocacy groups pleaded with the Louisiana board to deny TigerSwan’s license, citing the type of intrusive surveillance reportedly employed by the company in North Dakota.
“TigerSwan follows people as if we were criminals,” said Anne Rolfes, founding director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade.
“We can disagree about the pipeline without resorting to such behavior.”

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Florida town requires solar on new homes.

Florida town requires solar on new homes.. Louisiana won’t give the security firm that tracked DAPL opponents a license.
The state Board of Private Security Examiners rebuffed the North Carolina company known as TigerSwan, citing a legal complaint filed by a similar North Dakota agency charging that the outfit operated in that state without legal permission.
Fabian Blache III, the board’s executive director, said that Louisiana law governing the private security industry is designed to protect the state’s people.
He said TigerSwan — which was denied a license in North Dakota twice — had not shown it could follow regulations.
Earlier this month, the Associated Press reported that Energy Transfer Partners said it no longer had a security presence on the ground in North Dakota, and TigerSwan said it had ended work with the Dallas-based pipeline developer at the end of June.
But apparently the firm was still seeking to work for Energy Transfer Partners in Louisiana, where the company is currently planning to build a 162-mile pipeline known as Bayou Bridge, which would shuttle refined crude oil to hubs in Texas.
That project, like Dakota Access, faces court challenges.
Regional advocacy groups pleaded with the Louisiana board to deny TigerSwan’s license, citing the type of intrusive surveillance reportedly employed by the company in North Dakota.
“TigerSwan follows people as if we were criminals,” said Anne Rolfes, founding director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade.
“We can disagree about the pipeline without resorting to such behavior.”

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